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Jeremy Hann’s practice is primarily focused on Employment and Labour litigation. He has appeared as defendant/respondent/employer counsel before the numerous Ontario tribunals, courts and arbitrators who hear labour, employment and human rights matters. Jeremy also maintains a busy day-to-day counselling practice where he assists employers in their HR counsel needs, as well as handling specials projects such as the employment, labour and benefits aspects of corporate transactions, mass reductions in force and workplace violence and harassment investigations. One of Jeremy’s principal strengths is his ability to leverage his litigation experience in order to provide practical and business-focused advice to employers as they navigate through the various human-rights related minefields. Jeremy has been a lawyer at Baker McKenzie since 2004.

Last month, key elements of Bill 132, Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act (Supporting Survivors and Challenging Sexual Violence and Harassment), 2016 (“Bill 132”), came into force. Employers are now required to have comprehensive policies and programs in place to address workplace harassment, along with detailed investigative procedures to be followed in response to complaints or incidents of harassment.

The latter requirement has led many employers to ask whether investigating is enough or if the employer can still be liable if the investigator gets it wrong. Continue Reading You Want Me to Do What? Guidance for the Newly-Appointed Workplace Harassment Investigator

If you are a professional sports fan…you know what time of year it is. September 8th is the first day of the NFL season. In three weeks’ time the MLB playoffs will start. The world cup of hockey starts soon. The NHL season begins shortly thereafter. US College football season is already in full force.

If you are not… you might be asking so what? What does this have to do with employment law? What does this have to do with my workplace? Continue Reading Happy September! What are the odds that your employees aren’t gambling at work?

Franchisors who place strict controls on their franchisees may also have to answer for their franchisee’s human rights practices.

Product and service consistency is the backbone of coffee giant Tim Hortons’ successful business model. Tim Hortons, like many other successful franchisors, imposes a strict regime on its stores in order to ensure that all Canadians can get the same cup of coffee, in the same cup, regardless of where they order it. Control manifests itself through an extensive franchise agreement, detailed operations rules and regular audits of individual stores.

Continue Reading Is the price of a consistent cup of coffee shared human rights liability?

Our regular readers will recall our previous posts (here and here) on upcoming changes to the Employment Standards Act.  On February 20, 2015, some of these changes will be coming into effect:

  • There will no longer be a limit on the amount that can be ordered for unpaid wages due to an employee.
  • Employees will have two years, rather than six months, to claim unpaid wages under the Act.
  • Employees may recover vacation pay due over the past twelve, rather than six, months.

If you have any questions about the changes, please feel free to contact our office for assistance.

As the festive season gets underway, many employers are in the process of planning their office holiday parties.  While it is someone else’s job to make sure there is enough eggnog, pick the band and make the call as to whether or not spouses should be invited,  it is our job to remind you to take steps to ensure that the Company will be in position to have a holiday party for years to come.

Make your Company’s new years resolution not to be involved in a multi-million dollar social host liability law suit. Continue Reading Keeping up the festive cheer while keeping your legal liability down – alcohol at your company holiday party

On July 16, 2014, the Ontario Government introduced  Bill 18, Stronger Workplaces for a Stronger Economy Act, 2014.  The Bill proposes changes that would (among other things) remove existing limits on unpaid wage claims, make temporary help agencies and their clients jointly liable for unpaid wages, and impose automatic adjustments to minimum wage based on the Consumer Price Index. Continue Reading Six Changes to Ontario Employment Legislation Proposed