Photo of Kevin Coon

Kevin Coon was called to the Ontario Bar in 1989. Kevin acts as counsel, and as trusted and strategic adviser to government, corporate and not-for-profit organizations, on human resource, regulatory, compliance and risk management, with emphasis on international labour standards; corporate social responsibility; ethics; codes of conduct; due diligence; human rights; workplace investigations; occupational health and safety; collective bargaining; workplace harassment; positive employee relations; local and global labour relations; government relations. Kevin is certified as a specialist in Labour Law by the Law Society of Ontario and has been recognized by Legal 500.

We are pleased to share with you the BNN Bloomberg article, “Breaking down CERB guidelines.” Kevin Coon was interviewed for this Q&A regarding the Canadian Emergency Response Benefit (CERB).

Click here to view the article

This article was originally posted in BNN Bloomberg

We are happy to share with you the BNN Bloomberg article, “How employers can avoid backlash from COVID-19 layoffs.” Kevin Coon was interviewed for this article providing dos and don’ts for employers to follow.

Click here to view the article

This article was originally posted in BNN Bloomberg.

Earlier this week, the Ontario government announced its intention to introduce legislation to amend the Employment Standards Act2000 (“ESA”), to provide job-protected leave to all employees impacted by COVID-19.
Continue Reading Ontario Passes Bill 186 Introducing New Job-Protected Leaves Amid COVID-19 Outbreak

Ontario Government Declares State of Emergency

The Government of Ontario declared a province-wide state of emergency in an effort to contain the spread of COVID-19. This will impact employers and employees.

The government ordered the closure of all facilities with recreational programs, public libraries, private schools as defined in the Education Act, licensed child care centres, movie and performance theatres, concert venues and bars and restaurants. Bars and restaurants that offer take out or delivery services can remain open for that purpose.
Continue Reading Update on COVID-19: Impact on the Workplace in Ontario

Companies worldwide face rising pressure to comply with international labour and human rights standards both within their operations and in their supply chains. In addition to the harmful impact on workers, failing to address labour and human rights risks can result in serious brand damage and legal risk, with consequent financial implications for the business.

In recent years, Canadian courts have increasingly heard large civil claims against Canadian companies for alleged human rights violations in their foreign operations. As we have discussed previously, judges faced with these claims must determine whether the court’s jurisdictional reach extends to the company’s activities in its global supply chain, thus permitting foreign claimants to pursue their action in Canada.
Continue Reading Rana Plaza Class Action Blocked in Ontario & Nevsun Decision Challenged at Canada’s Highest Court

We have written over the past two years about a growing wave of significant lawsuits in Canada against corporations for alleged international labour and human rights violations in their overseas operations or supply chains. As we have reported, Canada’s judiciary is demonstrating a willingness to expand their jurisdictional reach to permit such claims to proceed. Canadian judges are keeping an open mind as to whether a novel duty of care exists between multinational companies and the upstream foreign supply chain workers or the local residents affected by their operations.
Continue Reading Door Still Open? Canada As Safe Harbour For Multinational Human Rights Litigation

Baker McKenzie is proud to have sponsored the Washington DC premiere of the film “I am Jane Doe” on February 7, 2017. The film is a highly anticipated documentary chronicling an ongoing battle against the trafficking of minors. The Washington premiere was part the McCain Institute’s 2nd Annual Human Trafficking Symposium. Baker McKenzie’s Peter

On October 6, 2016, the British Columbia Supreme Court ruled that a lawsuit by Eritrean miners, who allege they were forced to work in a mine owned by Nevsun Resources Ltd, a Canadian mining company, can proceed to trial. Vancouver-based Nevsun had argued that the case should be dismissed and that any suit should be properly heard in Eritrea. Justice Abrioux disagreed, stating that “there is sufficient cogent evidence from which I can conclude that there is a real risk that the plaintiffs could not be provided with justice in Eritrea,” thereby paving the way for an unprecedented trial in a Canadian court. Justice Abrioux stated that “claims of crimes against humanity, slavery, forced labour and torture can go forward against Nevsun.”
Continue Reading BC Case Against Canadian Mining Company for Overseas Human Rights Violations to Proceed to Trial