Social Media & Technology

Catch ’em all!  Pokémon Go is a mobile game that uses “augmented” reality to create a virtual scavenger hunt.  In the quest to catch ’em all, over 15 million people have downloaded the Pokémon Go game since its recent release.  Employers have grappled with employees’ personal use of electronic devices during work hours since gaming fads such as Candy Crush and Draw Something were released.  However, beyond creating a simple distraction in the workplace, the explosion of Pokémon Go subjects employers to potentially costly risks, including worker safety issues, lost productivity, data breach possibilities, and misuse of company resources.
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Almost everyone in Canada is using a smart phone. Recent statistics tell us that more than 80% of 18-34 year olds are using smart phones. For each prior generation, 35-44 and 45-54, that number only drops by 10%, and the projection is that at least 85% for all age ranges, and as high as 98% for 18-34 year olds, will be using smart phones by 2018.[1] Or, you can simply check the number of smart phone users when you see anyone having to wait for anything.

Our embrace of connectivity drove businesses to provide employees with company-issued mobile phones. Now there is another shift, where employees are increasingly expecting or expected to use their personal devices for work-related matters.


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Food & Agribusiness Labour Issues in 2015 & Beyond

Date: March 18, 2015 |  Time: 1:00 – 2:00 PM EST

Labour, employment and immigration topics continue to be hot button issues for companies operating in the food and agribusiness space. To help navigate recent changes, Baker & McKenzie’s top employment lawyers will discuss the following topics during our webinar on Wednesday, March 18, 2015:

  • New NLRB election rules
  • Managing the new era of social media and email
  • Union organizing of fast food workers
  • International Framework Agreements
  • Immigration regulations


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(Canadian businesses with U.S. & international operations should consider this webinar, hosted by our colleagues in Palo Alto, California and Munich, Germany.)

More and more employers are adopting Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs as a cost-effective way to provide their workforces with the most up-to-date smartphones, tablets and laptops. As recent headlines show, these programs can open the doors to substantial data privacy risks and security breaches, as the use of personal devices for business further blurs the lines between work and private activities. What measures should employers take now to minimize these risks?
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