Forty percent of Canadian workers experience bullying on a weekly basis. Moreover, 7% of adult internet users in Canada self-reported experiencing cyberbullying at some point in their life. The most common form of cyberbullying involves receiving threatening or aggressive emails or instant messages.[1] Continue Reading Beyond the Playground: Stamping out Workplace Cyberbullying

We’re thrilled to announce the release of a new edition of The Global Employer: Focus on Global Immigration & Mobility.

This handbook is the go-to resource for in-house counsel, human resource managers and global relocation professionals to identify key mobility issues — ranging from business immigration and compliance, to employment and compensation. It provides strategic guidance and need-to-know information to help employers manage cross-border movement of managers, professionals, trainees and business visitors.

Click here to request a complimentary copy for yourself or your colleagues.

Companies worldwide face rising pressure to comply with international labour and human rights standards both within their operations and in their supply chains. In addition to the harmful impact on workers, failing to address labour and human rights risks can result in serious brand damage and legal risk, with consequent financial implications for the business. We’re pleased to share our recent Bloomberg publication, here, with an update on existing and proposed legislation and best practices for mitigating risk.

Originally published in Bloomberg Law August 2019. Reproduced with permission. Copyright 2019 The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. www.bna.com

 

Changes to the Canada Labour Code (“CLC” or “Code”) are effective on September 1, 2019, or on a date to be named. To ensure compliance, federally regulated employers should review their policies and practices.

This is part two of a two-part series summarizing the changes.  Part one focused on federal employment standards related to vacation, holiday and leave entitlements.  This part summarizes the remaining changes. Continue Reading Now Effective: Changes to the Canada Labour Code (Part Two)

Changes to the Canada Labour Code (“CLC” or “Code”) are effective on September 1, 2019.  To ensure compliance, federally regulated employers should review their policies and procedures.

This is part one of a two part series summarizing changes to the Code.  This part focuses on federal employment standards related to vacation, holiday and leave entitlements.  The remaining changes will be summarized in part two. Continue Reading Now Effective: Changes to the Canada Labour Code (Part One)

Employers often wish to enter new or updated employment agreements with existing employees. The driving force is typically that circumstances have changed, but it can also be that the employer simply wants different or additional terms. However, the employer must give the employee valid consideration, otherwise the new or updated agreement will not be enforceable. Continue Reading A New Contract for a Current Employee? Consider the Consideration!

We’re in a period of unprecedented transformation, driven by technological development, globalization and significant demographic changes. Our world is hyper-connected, and the pace of change is rapid, bringing social and political transformation and creating profound global shifts in expectations. Global employers must evolve at speed to meet these disruptive forces head-on and to thrive in this future of work.

To help you chart your course, we’re delighted to share key messages and insights from our fourth Global Employer Forum, here, along with a short video, here, featuring Ian Goldin, Oxford University Professor and Director of the Oxford Martin Programme, in conversation with our colleague, Guenther Heckelmann, on adapting to rapid globalization and thriving in the age of discovery.

The Ontario Court of Appeal has reiterated that, barring exceptional circumstances, reasonable notice for dismissal without cause will not exceed 24 months. The Court partially overturned the lower court’s decision in Dawe v The Equitable Life Insurance Company of Canada, which also ruled on the enforceability of unilateral changes to the employer’s bonus plan. Continue Reading 24 Months Reaffirmed as the “High End” of Reasonable Notice; Bonus Plan Changes Must Be Accepted by Employee

We’re pleased to share a recent Bloomberg article by our colleagues, Benjamin Ho and Caroline Pham. Benjamin and Caroline examine what the next generation of workers, Generation Z, want from and can offer employers. To get ahead of the curve in preparing for the change that this new generation will bring, read their informative article here.

Companies doing business in Mexico can anticipate that unions will move quickly to legitimize existing collective agreements under a new government-issued protocol. Among other steps, the process entails a vote by covered employees to determine whether they support the agreement. Collective agreements must be legitimized by May 1, 2023 or they will be terminated.

We’re pleased to share a client alert from our Mexican colleagues, New Protocol in Place for Unions to Legitimize Collective Bargaining Agreements, on this important development.