To ring in the New Year, we highlight the ten most significant developments in Canadian labour and employment law in 2018. Continue Reading Top 10 Canadian Labour & Employment Law Developments of 2018

As stories of workplace harassment and discrimination permeate the news and social media accounts, the Supreme Court of Canada (“SCC”) has expanded the scope of provincial human rights legislation to impose liability on co-workers – even when those co-workers have different employers. Continue Reading Supreme Court of Canada Expands Workplace Discrimination Protection to Cover Non-Employees

A lawsuit brought by several Guatemalans for alleged damages suffered during a 2013 protest at the Escobal silver mine in San Rafael Las Flores has cleared a final hurdle and will now proceed to trial in British Columbia. Continue Reading BC Trial on Alleged Human Rights Violations by Canadian Mining Company in Guatemala Can Proceed

Minimum wages continue to rise across Canada. Recent increases have been implemented in British Columbia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island and Saskatchewan. As well, Alberta’s NDP government has continued to pursue its goal of a $15 per hour minimum wage by 2018 by implementing incremental increases. Several other provinces will see a further increase in their minimum wage in April. Continue Reading Minimum Wage Update: Increases in AB, BC, ON, PEI and SK

Franchisors who place strict controls on their franchisees may also have to answer for their franchisee’s human rights practices.

Product and service consistency is the backbone of coffee giant Tim Hortons’ successful business model. Tim Hortons, like many other successful franchisors, imposes a strict regime on its stores in order to ensure that all Canadians can get the same cup of coffee, in the same cup, regardless of where they order it. Control manifests itself through an extensive franchise agreement, detailed operations rules and regular audits of individual stores.

Continue Reading Is the price of a consistent cup of coffee shared human rights liability?

Despite the economic controversy, Alberta’s NDP government appears to be following through on its promise to increase the province’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2018.  On October 1, 2015, the minimum wage in Alberta will increase from $10.20 to $11.20, with planned further increases in the years to come.  Following this initial increase, Alberta will have one of the highest minimum wages in Canada. Continue Reading Minimum Wage Update: NDP Government Raises Minimum Wage in Alberta

Under British Columbia’s Workers Compensation Act (“Act”) an employer must immediately notify WorkSafeBC of a workplace accident that (among other things):

  • results in serious injury or death to a worker
  • involves a major structural failure or collapse
  • involves the major release of a hazardous substance

When such accidents occur, the scene of the accident must not be disturbed until an investigation has taken place.

At first glance the “reporting requirement” is clear. But in practice it can give rise to uncertainty. For example, if the worksite is not owned by the employer, must the owner report? And who is responsible for reporting incidents when there are multiple employers on a single worksite? Continue Reading Who is required to report workplace accidents in British Columbia?