UPDATE: March 18, 2020

On March 18, 2020, the Canadian and US governments announced that the Canada-US border will be closing to all non-essential travel between Canada and the USA, such as travel for tourism or recreation. These border restrictions will take effect within “hours or days”. Both governments have indicated that today’s announcement is not intended to restrict commerce and trade. Cross-border entry will continue to be permitted to maintain essential services and supply chain processes. This includes workers who are traveling to provide essential goods and services, such as truck drivers and healthcare workers.
Continue Reading Canada and US Governments Close Border to Non-Essential Travel

The #MeToo and Times Up movements have led to significant cultural shifts and a collective call to action to end sexual harassment and related forms of exploitation. Since many of the high profile allegations involved abuse of power and quid pro quo demands in the context of employment relationships, the impact on employers has been profound.
Continue Reading Not Just South of the Border: Canadian Employers Should Expect More Gender-Based Disputes

To mark International Women’s Day, we’re pleased to share an article from our US colleagues on recent efforts to close the gender pay gap, including salary history bans in the US and global efforts toward transparency reporting. The article, authored by Todd BoyerCaroline Burnett and Elizabeth Ebersole, can be accessed here.

We’re pleased to share Baker McKenzie’s US Employment & Compensation Law Digest 2018/2019. The Digest outlines recent developments in US law relevant to employers and provides insight on global trends in gender pay, #MeToo, business change, and the modern workforce. In short, it’s an invaluable resource for Canadian companies with operations in the US

While President Trump’s Executive Order temporarily banning certain foreign nationals from entry into the United States is dominating the headlines these days, employers who have employees with US passports now have something else to worry about. Under a 2015 law, the State Department has the right to revoke a US taxpayer’s passport for nonpayment of

Join Baker McKenzie for a special 2-part webinar series that will focus on major developments in 2016 and trends to watch for in 2017 in the United States and around the globe. Drawing on the legal talent of Baker McKenzie’s employment team, the series will feature a panel of top lawyers discussing key updates. This series is a “must-view” for professionals who deal with employment matters within Canadian businesses operating outside of Canada. Register now for this complimentary webinar series!
Continue Reading Upcoming Webinar – Navigating Employment Laws Where You Work: 2016 Review and 2017 Preview

Earlier this year, we wrote about the US Department of Labor’s (DOL) publication of the Final Rule, which significantly increased the minimum salary an employee must earn to qualify for the “white collar” exemption and the highly compensated employee exemption under federal law (see our blog post here). However, on November 22, 2016, a 

webinarCanadian businesses with operations in the United States should be aware that the US Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission recently issued antitrust guidance for human resource professionals and others who are involved in hiring and compensation decisions. The guidance warns of criminal prosecution against companies, human resource professionals and other individuals for formal and informal wage-fixing or no-poaching agreements between companies. The agencies also encourage companies, human resource professionals and other individuals to quickly report antitrust violations to the Department of Justice under its Corporate and Individual Leniency Policies. To learn more about the guidance, please read our client alert.
Continue Reading US Federal Agencies Issue Joint Guidance for HR Professionals Warning of Criminal Liability for Wage-Fixing and No-Poaching Agreements