To ring in the New Year, we highlight the ten most significant developments in Canadian labour and employment law in 2018. Continue Reading Top 10 Canadian Labour & Employment Law Developments of 2018

This is the second article in our two-part series in which we highlight changes under Quebec’s Bill 176, An Act to amend the Act respecting labour standards and other legislative provisions mainly to facilitate family-work balance.

In our first article, we outlined the new standard for directors’ and officers’ liability and several new compliance obligations for Quebec employers. Here we focus on changes to leave entitlements. Continue Reading “Sorry, I Need Time Off” ‒ Quebec Expands Employee Leave Entitlements

The National Assembly of Quebec has made wide-ranging changes to the province’s labour standards legislation. The amendments were enacted through Bill 176, An Act to amend the Act respecting labour standards and other legislative provisions mainly to facilitate family-work balance, which received Royal Assent on June 12, 2018. Employers with operations in Ontario and Alberta, should also be aware that these provinces also made significant changes to their respective employment standards legislation earlier this year.

This is the first of two articles summarizing the key changes in Quebec. This article outlines changes to the scope of liability for directors and officers and new compliance obligations for Quebec employers. The second article will outline changes to leave entitlements. Continue Reading Quebec Makes Broad Changes to its Workplace Standards

Despite the economic controversy, Alberta’s NDP government appears to be following through on its promise to increase the province’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2018.  On October 1, 2015, the minimum wage in Alberta will increase from $10.20 to $11.20, with planned further increases in the years to come.  Following this initial increase, Alberta will have one of the highest minimum wages in Canada. Continue Reading Minimum Wage Update: NDP Government Raises Minimum Wage in Alberta

Business is becoming increasingly global as companies establish operations in various countries throughout the world. As profitable as this strategy may be, expansion is not without its difficulties. Where an employer is a subsidiary or branch of a larger foreign corporation, for instance, there may be issues regarding conflicting laws and regulations. For example, where a parent company is expected to abide by one set of laws in the United States, but adherence to those laws may be viewed as discriminatory in Canada, what is the appropriate course of action for a Canadian subsidiary or branch?

On July 23, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada (“SCC”) released its decision in Quebec (Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse) v. Bombardier Inc. The case was the SCC’s first opportunity to consider alleged discrimination based on foreign laws. Continue Reading Acting Locally, Thinking Globally: The Impact of Foreign Laws on Canadian Employers