Special thanks to Sarah Adler, Immigration Legal Counsel.

Our webinar was designed to bring Canadian in-house counsel and human resources leaders up to speed on the top labour, employment and human rights law developments of 2022 and to prepare them for what’s on the horizon in 2023.  

Using our “quick hits” format, we

To wrap up 2022 and prepare for 2023, we highlighted key developments in Canadian labour and employment law:

1. COVID-19 Update

Workplace Vaccination Policies

Mandatory vaccination policies remained a prevalent issue in 2022. The first decisions to provide guidance on this topic came out of unionized workplaces, with many upholding vaccination policies.

In Toronto District

The new year brings new challenges for employers. Join us as we take stock of changes over the last year and strategize for what’s on the horizon. 

In our 75-minute “quick hits” format, we’ll help Canadian in-house counsel and human resources leaders track what to keep top-of-mind for 2023. We’ll also provide practical takeaways to help

Summary

On November 14, 2022, Bill 26 – Strengthening Post-secondary Institutions and Students Act, 2022, passed second reading in the Ontario legislature. If passed, Bill 26 will be effective on July 1, 2023, and will transform how post-secondary institutions and private career colleges address sexual misconduct by faculty and staff.

Bill 26’s key changes

In September 2022, the Ontario Court of Appeal in Pavlov v. The New Zealand and Australian Lamb Company Limited (“Pavlov“) confirmed that an employer may be liable for a longer notice period, even for a short-term employee, based on prevailing economic factors beyond the parties’ control. In this case, it was COVID-19.

Background

Employers are being faced with difficult decisions about potentially reducing their headcount to eliminate redundant positions in light of a shift in the economic climate and an increased focus on business efficiency.

With any termination comes liability.

In this 3-part series of In Focus videos specific to Reductions in Force, our Labour and Employment

We are pleased to share a recent Benefits Canada article, “Employers seeking to withhold termination entitlements must prove wilful misconduct pre-planned: Ontario court,” with quotes from George Avraam. A recent Ontario Court of Appeal decision raises the bar for employers seeking to withhold minimum entitlements under the Employment Standards Act from employees dismissed for cause.

In a recent decision, the British Columbia Supreme Court (“BC Court“) ruled that Canada Emergency Response Benefit (“CERB”) payments earned during the notice period would be deducted from wrongful dismissal damages. This decision stands in stark contrast to that recently issued in Ontario, where the Superior Court of Justice (“Ontario Court“)

Following almost a year of uncertainty, the Ontario Superior Court finally clarified that temporary layoffs during the COVID-19 pandemic can amount to constructive dismissal under the common-law. Ontario employers should take note of this important decision if they have or are considering temporary staffing cuts, including temporary reductions in hours.
Continue Reading COVID Layoffs Can Lead to Employer Liability, Ontario Court Says